Positive Psychology and the Science of Happiness

happiness scientistOn the internet and in bookstores, a thousand gurus tout different remedies for human misery. How can we find out which remedies work? We need to consult one of our greatest gurus, the scientific method. Recently we have seen a dramatic upsurge in scientific studies on Positive Psychology and the science of happiness or to put it simply, discovering what makes happy people happy. Fortunately, many of these studies point to specific ways of thinking and acting that can strongly impact our sense of well-being and happiness. The resulting discoveries are enriching the practices of counseling, clinical psychology, psychiatry and life coaching. In these pages, we review the most scientific studies and translate the results into non-technical English.

The 7 Habits of Happy People

 

Relationships

relationships

Express your heart. People who have one or more close friendships are happier. It doesn’t seem to matter if we have a large network of close relationships or not. What seems to make a difference is if and how often we cooperate in activities and share our personal feelings with a friend or relative. Continue »

Caring

caring

Cultivate kindness. People who volunteer or simply care for others on a consistent basis seem to be happier and less depressed. Although “caring” can involve volunteering as part of an organized group or club, it can be as simple as reaching out to a colleague or classmate who looks lonely or is struggling with an issue. Continue »

Exercise

exercise and happiness: running

Keep moving. Regular exercise has been associated with improved mental well-being and a lower incidence of depression. The Cochrane Review (the most influential medical review of its kind in the world) has produced a landmark analysis of 23 studies on exercise and depression. One of the major conclusions was that exercise had a “large clinical impact.” Continue »

Flow

violinistFind your flow. If we are deeply involved in trying to reach a goal, or an activity that is challenging but well suited to our skills, we experience a joyful state called “flow.” Continue »

Spiritual Engagement and Meaning

Discovering Meaning. Studies demonstrate a close link between spiritual and religious practice and happiness. Spirituality is closely related to the discovery of greater meaning in our lives. As the psychologist Martin Seligman emphasizes, through the meaningful life we discover a deeper kind of happiness, Continue »

Strengths and Virtues

Discover and use your strengths. Studies by experts such as Martin Seligman in the new field of Positive Psychology show that the happiest people are those that have discovered their unique strengths (such as persistence and critical thinking) and virtues (such as humanity) and use those strengths and virtues for a purpose that is greater than their own personal goals (Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment). Continue »

Positive Mindset: Optimism, Mindfulness and Gratitude

winnie the pooh

Treasure gratitude, mindfulness, and hope. Of all the areas studied in the relatively young field of positive psychology, gratitude has perhaps received the most attention. According to studies conducted by Martin Seligman, grateful people have been shown to have greater positive emotion, a greater sense of belonging, and lower incidence of depression and stress. Continue »

 

Discover more about the Science of Happiness

Learn more about the Science of Happiness and its practical applications in the online Certificate Course on the Psychology of Happiness. Or you can register for our online 3 credit college course Psychological and Philosophical Perspectives on Happiness. These programs are ideal for individuals interested in personal happiness, as well as professionals involved in counseling, clinical psychology, psychiatry and  life coaching.